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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. The median nerve is one of the nerves from the brachial plexus which innervates the hand muscles. The median nerve passes through the wrist in a narrow channel called the carpal tunnel, along with the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor pollicis longus tendons.

Wrist pain can make normal daily activities extremely difficult. self-care becomes harder, driving the car is dangerous and lifting even light objects is challenging. It is most important to seek care and treatment for wrist pain to avoid needless accidents and pain.

What can cause Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)?

Carpal tunnel syndrome can be caused by a number of factors, including:

  • Traumatic wrist injury such as sprains and fractures
  • Repetitive overuse of the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome is a form of RSI)
  • Pregnancy – causing fluid retention in the wrist
  • Occupational overuse of vibrating machinery
  • Congenital predilection – some people naturally have a smaller, narrower carpal tunnel
  • Arthritis – Inflammatory and degenerative changes can contribute to development of Carpal Tunnel syndrome (CTS)

Narrowing of the Carpal Tunnel

All of these conditions can cause a narrowing of the space through which the median nerve passes. The cause may be structural such as with a fracture, congenital, or due to swelling, inflammation and fluid retention.

What are the chances of me getting Carpal Tunnel syndrome (CTS)?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is three times more common in women, probably because they physically have a smaller carpal tunnel and subsequent area for the median nerve to pass through. CTS is more prevalent in people with diabetes and other conditions which directly affect the nervous system. CTS usually occurs firstly and sometimes solely in the dormant hand, where it is also more painful. Some occupations and professions pose more risk toward the development of carpal tunnel syndrome, accompanied with continually repeating the same movement.

What are the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)?

  • Symptoms usually increase gradually and may initially only be present at night.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome may be in one or both wrists.
  • A dull ache in the wrist and forearm
  • Pain which radiates into the thumb and four fingers (excluding the little finger) but not the palm.
  • Sensations of tingling or burning in the hand or four fingers
  • Pain which is worse at night
  • Pain may radiate into the forearm, elbow or shoulder
  • Weakness in the fingers and hands

Treatments for carpal tunnel

Chiropractic, Physiotherapy, Osteopathy and Massage co-management may provide answers and relief in certain instances when the (CTS) is due to degeneration and muscle contracture. Other modalities which may help in addition to alternative and complementary therapies mentioned include Laser therapy, Therapeutic ultrasound, Interferential and stretches.

Prolotherapy treatment for carpal tunnel and wrist pain

Prolotherapy injections are also used to help with recovery and treatment of wrist pains including carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Prolotherapy is provided at our Western Australian Sports Injury Clinic by Dr Masslowski. Prolotherapy treatments use a mixture of glucose and saline which is injected into hard to heal tissue, the body reacts to the area of the injection with a natural healing respose. For more information check our Perth Sports Injury Clinic.

Call 0208 651 4439 and speak to one of our team at Croydon Sports Injury Clinic to explore your options today.


Croydon Sports Injury Clinic Ltd | 0 208 651 4439